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http://www.guitarworld.com/exposed-10-female-guitarists-you-should-know-part-2 “>http://www.guitarworld.com/exposed-10-female-guitarists-you-should-know-part-2

10 Female Guitarists You Should Know, Part 2

Posted 09/02/2011 at 10:14am | by Laura B. Whitmore, Anna Blumenthal

 

Ana Egge

Here’s something you don’t see every day: a guitar player who built her own guitar. Yep, when she was 17, Egge’s astrology teacher, also an accomplished luthier, invited her to work on a guitar as his apprentice … and she still plays it to this day (Wait, they teach astrology in high school?). You can see a vignette about her guitar on MusicRadar here. Egge has toured and shared the stage with a stable of greats including Lucinda Williams, Ralph Stanley, Shawn Colvin, Joan Armatrading, Iris Dement, Richard Thompson, George Jones and many more. This North Dakota-raised songstress knows how to dish out some sadly sweet ballads. Her latest release, Bad Blood, came out August 23 on Ammal Records, produced by Steve Earle. Egge’s ethereal vocals spin above some sweet, chiming guitar tracks, complete with effective effects. Perfect for those full-pint-of-ice cream, melancholy rainy evenings. Visit anaegge.com for more info.

Here she is with the infamous self-made guitar:

 


Ana on WNYC’s Soundcheck 8/29/11


In Studio: Ana Egge

Monday, August 29, 2011

listen-
http://www.wnyc.org/shows/soundcheck/2011/aug/29/studio-ana-egge/
  • Ana Egge Enlarge

    Ana Egge (Courtesy of the artist)

Folk troubadour Ana Egge just released her seventh record, a collage of songs portraying different aspects of mental illness. She joins us in the studio to perform live.


Bloody good: an interview with Ana Egge in Gay Chicago


Bloody good: an interview with Ana Egge

Posted by Gregg Shapiro on August 28, 2011 in Interview, Uncategorized · 0 Comments

A musical expression of out singer/songwriter Ana Egge’s personal struggles to cope with the mental illness that struck members of her family, “Bad Blood” (Ammal) is an emotionally visceral recording. But it is through the music, in songs such as the title cut, Driving With No Hands, Evil, Walking With the Wolves and Hole In Your Halo, that Egge confronts the situation with unblinking compassion, resulting in messages of hope and survival. I spoke with Ana in mid-August 2011 before she embarked on her tour. (Ana Egge performs on Sept. 10 at FitzGerald’s in Berwyn.)

GREGG SHAPIRO: Ana, who do you consider to be your musical influences?

ANA EGGE: Early on, I would definitely say k.d. lang was a huge influence and Bonnie Raitt. And then Lyle Lovett and the Grateful Dead and lots of bluegrass stuff. Definitely the Indigo Girls, too.

GS: As you say in the liner notes for your new disc “Bad Blood,” this is the fourth time that you are working with ParkinSong. How did you become involved with the label and the organization?

AE: Basically, Rob Litowitz, who founded ParkinSong heard me on NPR’s Morning Edition back in ’98. He produced a concert for me in the (Washington) D.C. area and we became close friends. He wanted to start doing something positively to effect what was happening to his mother (Selma) – she was living with Parkinson’s for many years. Eventually she passed away after living with it for 15 years, I think. He and his sisters started doing these annual benefit concerts and I played all of them. Then I worked with him on a CD he wanted to do to benefit the Parkinson’s Foundation. He got a lot of great artists to submit songs and in that he formed his label and then he signed me. We did three albums together. This one (“Bad Blood”) we produced together but it’s coming out on Ammal Records.

GS: Funds to pay for the making of your new disc “Bad Blood” were raised via Kickstarter. Why did you choose to go that route?

AE: Several people had told me about it and this album was a step up for me in a few different ways and we realized that we were going to have to come up with more money than before. We looked into Kickstarter and seemed like a really great model and it worked well.

GS: So you’d recommend it to other musicians and artitsts.

AE: Yes, I think it’s a great way for fans, friends and family to have an eye in on the process. It’s really a great way to engage and share all the different aspects of making a record. It’s not just all of a sudden I wrote these songs and here it is, it’s done. You can be in touch with everyone who is on your list about all the different steps of recording and picking the musicians and the artwork and the manufacturing.

GS: Last year, Rodney Crowell produced an album by out singer/songwriter Chely Wright and your disc “Bad Blood” was produced by Steve Earle, who along with his wife Allison Moorer, also performs on the album. Do you think that says something about changing attitudes towards the LGBT community and performers in musicians with connections to Nashville?

AE:I think so. Steve is very outspoken in support of gays and lesbians. He’s very liberal. He calls himself a socialist. I know that doesn’t necessarily mean that they support us and respect equal rights for everyone [laughs], but he certainly does.

GS: And what was it like to work with Steve on the record?

AE: It was really exciting and fun. He’s very full of energy and creative beyond where I expected. Every day was full of surprises. It was great.

GS: Your 2009 disc “Road To My Love,” was probably your most pop-oriented effort, while “Bad Blood” is undeniably country. Do you think one is a truer representation of you musically?

AE: I’ve always striven to write great songs. I feel like the presentation of them is always up for debate. What instruments I choose to play on the songs on the record, that begins to flavor the genre, if I have fiddles versus horns. The freedom of making albums and having the creative input in production is that you can decide those flavors that you are going to use. As I was writing the songs for the last record, I heard horn lines, so I was really grateful that I found great players to frame those songs in that way. With this new record, I was thinking of it as more a bluegrass country record and then Steve wanted heavy-hitting drums on the songs, so we made a country rock record.

GS: Do you think that the subject matter, dealing with family members’ issues with mental illness, was better suited to this style of music?

AE: Yeah, I think so. In a way, it naturally went that way in the writing process where I was dealing with these home and family-based topics. I was drawn back to the first music that I loved, which was mostly old-time folk, bluegrass music. Stuff I learned on my guitar and mandolin.

GS: Album opener Driving With No Hands perfectly sets the mood, beginning with the angry sounding guitar and the ominous strings, and the image of “concrete white sheets/blood in my teeth.” Was it always your intention to begin the album with this song?

AE: No, not at all. That’s an important thing that I want to communicate. There is some anger on this record. When you have family members suffering, I’m not angry at them. I have had a lot of anger at the illness, wanting it to stop, go away. A lot of the writing freed up for me when I started writing about the illness itself as a character.

GS: You mentioned the drums and the title cut “Bad Blood” has a beat like blood pumping through veins. Was this the way you heard it as you were writing it?

AE: No, that was Steve.

GS: Do you really have a motorcycle as you sing in the song Motorcycle?

AE: Yeah, I have a motorcycle. I keep it at my place in New Mexico. On the tank it says, “Yermama” [laughs]. It’s a ’76 Yamaha 650. I took the decals off the side and put them back on to say, “Yermama” [laughs].

GS: Now it’s customized. What do you like best about it?

AE: I have knobby tires on it so I can take it on dirt roads and it’s so much fun to ride. I remember when I first started driving cars and I went back to motorcycles, how much more comfortable I felt on a motorcycle.

GS: Please tell me that you wear a helmet.

AE: I do!

GS: Thank you.

AE: [Laughs]

GS: You are going to be on tour during the fall – what are you most looking forward to about that?

AE: There’s so much freedom on the road. I love the newness everyday of putting myself out there and not knowing who I am going to meet or where I’m going to eat or where I’m going to sleep [laughs] sometimes. I really love that. It feeds the creative side of what I do.

Gregg Shapiro- Gay Chicago


Rolling Stone review – Bad Blood


Ana Egge – Bad Blood
Ammal
Rolling Stone: 3.5 star rating

You can’t say this North Dakota-raised singer-songwriter doesn’t have range. Her 2007 Lazy Days, a breezy concept LP about idleness, covered Arcade Fire and the Kinks. Her latest, a team-up with producer Steve Earle, is folk-rock storytelling stained red and flush with madness. “Blood on the floor,” she sings sweetly on “Evil,” a standout on a set that’s as upbeat musically as it is chilling lyrically. Egge rocks harder than usual on “Driving With No Hands” and works her sublime lower-register on the Richard Thompson-flavored “Shadow Fall.” And her sprightly reading of Charlie Rich’s kiss-off “There Won’t Be Anymore” places her tuneful noir in a long American tradition of depressing feel-good music. Thank the Puritans.


Rolling Stone review


Ana Egge – Bad Blood
Ammal
Rolling Stone: 3.5 star rating

You can’t say this North Dakota-raised singer-songwriter doesn’t have range. Her 2007 Lazy Days, a breezy concept LP about idleness, covered Arcade Fire and the Kinks. Her latest, a team-up with producer Steve Earle, is folk-rock storytelling stained red and flush with madness. “Blood on the floor,” she sings sweetly on “Evil,” a standout on a set that’s as upbeat musically as it is chilling lyrically. Egge rocks harder than usual on “Driving With No Hands” and works her sublime lower-register on the Richard Thompson-flavored “Shadow Fall.” And her sprightly reading of Charlie Rich’s kiss-off “There Won’t Be Anymore” places her tuneful noir in a long American tradition of depressing feel-good music. Thank the Puritans.


Bad Blood review – Consequence of sound


Album Review: Ana Egge – Bad Blood

By Austin Trunick on August 16th, 2011 in Album Reviews

Ana Egge sings with the cool confidence of a seasoned veteran; she’s been quietly releasing a series of excellent folk-country albums since the late 1990s. Egge is a singer-songwriter with a gift for telling stories and creating fully-fleshed characters within her lyrics. Bad Blood, Egge’s latest, draws a series of portraits of mental illness in different forms and from different angles. Written in response to watching several family members suffer from various afflictions, many of the songs featured on the album show a young artist coping the way she knows best.“Your flowers are growing wild in the west/They may be pretty but/they’re poisonous,” Egge sings on “Hole in Your Halo”, a song inspired by a visit with a mentally ill relative in prison. A hard bass drum beat propels “Bad Blood” forward, a menacing, tremolo-coated guitar cutting the path for a song that personifies disease as an animal running wild through the countryside. “When I wake up/Will I wake up?” she asks in “Driving With No Hands”, singing from the first-person view of someone dealing with unpredictable mood swings and dangerous behavior. “Evil” paints a disturbing picture of a man compulsively driven to murder but unable to endure the guilt that follows.The warm, down-to-earth production on Bad Blood comes from like-minded troubadour Steve Earle, who shared members of his band for the recordings and sings backup on several songs. On “Your Voice Convinces Me”, the pounding percussion and Egge’s lilting melody lift up the track as the album’s high-water moment. Half a triumphant march and half backwoods gospel, Earle lends his voice for support at the song’s peak, just before it breaks away to a euphoric violin solo. It caps the album on a much-welcomed note of hopefulness, a song about the ability to overcome difficulty, on an album whose many subjects never even stood a chance.

Essential Tracks: “Your Voice Convinces Me”, “Bad Blood”

http://consequenceofsound.net/2011/08/album-review-ana-egge-bad-blood/


New video for ‘Hole in Your Halo”



Pop-Break.com (Jun 30, 2011)


Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Ana Egge’s latest album Bad Blood perfectly encapsulates her sweet melodies, soft mixture of country and alternative rock and deep, haunting lyrics.

Recorded in the famous Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock, NY and produced by Steve Earle, a man whose reputation and influence precede him, Bad Blood details her experiences with family members suffering from mental illness. Egge’s beautiful voice and catchy backing beats nearly mask the sad nature of the songs.
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Austin Chronicle


Ana Egge
Lazy Days (Grace)

For some artists, releasing an entire disc of covers signals a holding pattern. Ana Egge’s Lazy Days is a collection of others’ tunes, but she’s stretching herself in ways that perhaps she couldn’t on her own. It’s as varied a set of choices as these things get, the local singer-songwriter with the sublime voice inhabiting and adapting songs from Gene Autry, Stephen Stills, the Kinks, Arcade Fire, Sandy Denny, and others into a sunny whole. Recorded in New York, Egge calls on such hotshots as drummer Anton Fier, guitarist Tony Scherr, and cellist Jane Scarpantoni to paint musical mattes of effortless times. Her version of Ron Sexsmith’s “Wastin’ Time” just might be more luxurious than the original, and the set closer, Harry Nilsson’s “Wastin’ My Time,” finds Egge as chanteuse, a part that she rarely plays but one she should explore more often. ***

Jim Caligiuri – Austin Chronicle


Edge – Feb 10, 2009


Road to My Love
by Christopher John Treacy
EDGE Contributor
Tuesday Feb 10, 2009

Egge took a detour through some delightfully “Lazy Days” on the road to her love, and it shows.

Whereas 2005’s “Out Past the Lights” shone bright with dizzyingly layered collages of sound and some ever-so-slightly barbed edges, her sixth collection triumphs with a refined sonic palette. Indeed, Egge has learned how to tastefully package her boozy crooning and musical idiosyncrasies into something wonderfully accessible, thereby achieving that ever-elusive balance between yummy ear candy and less user-friendly creative expressions. Somehow she keeps it all very personal, as though she’s seated right beside you on a picnic blanket, explaining in hushed tones where she’s been and where she’s going… as a listener, you’re being confided in.
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