Ana Egge & The Moss Bros. Rockwood 1, NYC Mon. DEC 1. 8PM


Fall 2014 shows

Hi Everybody-

I haven’t been playing a whole heck of a lot lately what with having a little baby at home. But now my daughter is almost one and I’m looking forward to picking up the pace a bit. I’ll be doing a few solo shows and another set at the Rockwood Music Hall with The Moss Bros. backing me up on cello, violin and harmonies Dec. 1. Our last show together was simply delicious!

I wish you all the best this season has to offer in color and harvest. Cheers, and I hope to see you soon!

Ana

Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Ana Egge String Band @ B side Ballroom
1 Clinton Plaza Drive , Oneonta, NY (United States) – Map
Set: 8:00 PM
All Ages
Saturday, October 18, 2014
Ana Egge @ Private Event- Farm to table supper club
Williamstown, MA (United States) – Map
Set: 8:00 PM
All Ages
Saturday, November 1, 2014
Ana Egge & Miss Tess & The Talkbacks @ Tin Angel
20 S 2nd St., Philadelphia, PA (United States) – Map
Set: 8:00 PM
All Ages
Monday, December 1, 2014
Ana Egge & The Moss Bros. @ Rockwood Music Hall
196 Allen St., New York, NY 10012 (United States) – Map
Set: 8:00 PM
21+

 


News from tour in Denmark, SXSW & my new mandolin

Greetings from Sunset Park Brooklyn.

The sun is rising. I’ve been home now for a few days from a great tour in Denmark with my backing band based over there, The Sentimentals. We played in theaters and clubs and for a first grade class who didn’t understand my English.

I did an interview with the US Embassy in Copenhagen about being a traveling songwriter & taught a college workshop for songwriters. I ate liver paste and drank rhubarb seltzer, and I witnessed Spring take hold on a Northern land.

Before Denmark, I was in Austin, TX for SXSW, which seems to grow exponentially every year. I found some amazing music and some great people. Mostly by staying away from the bigger crowds and staying South of the river.

In January I received my new mandolin that was custom built for me by my old friend Bill Bussman of Old Wave instruments in Caballo, NM. It rings like a bell! And the top wood he used for it came from Don Musser, who I built my guitar

with years ago. So now my guitar has a little sister. I couldn’t be happier. It’s been on the road with me ever since. I hope you’re sitting pretty from wherever you read this. Cheers! Ana

 

 


SXSW 2014

Stephen F’s Bar, SXSW 701 Congress Ave. Austin, TX Fri. March 14, 1AM

I’m returning to SX after a couple years away to perform songs from my new, upcoming album with The Stray Birds!

Beauty beauty beauty.

 

 


Summer tour 2013


MusicCanada.com

Maïa Davies: ‘Takes A Woman Like You’, Vol. 9: Ana Egge

By Maïa Davies on Aug 01, 2013

Maïa Davies of Ladies of the Canyon is back with ‘Takes A Woman Like You,’ a new feature blog at Music Canada that brings a twist to the traditional music interview. This summer, Maïa will pick the brains of smart, strange, and relevant women working as part of the Canadian music industry. In her seventh update, Maïa speaks with Ana Egge:

The first time I heard Ana Egge’s music, she had until that moment been unknown to me. I was on a wintery Ontario tour, checking in to another strange hotel. We laid our bags down and my tour mate pulled up Ana’s video for “Morning” on my laptop. Within 15 seconds, I was in tears, flooded by the raw emotion and stunning beautiful quality of her voice and songs. I later had the honour of playing a few shows opening for her in Toronto and New York City, watching her badass band (featuring fellow Canadian Peter Elkas on guitar) tear through her haunting, powerful songs. Raised in North Dakota and Saskatchewan, now living in Brooklyn, Egge is a somewhat best-kept secret of the music scene. Ron Sexsmith is her biggest fan. So is Steve Earle, and he produced her last record, entitled “Bad Blood”. Do yourself a favor and discover her, if you haven’t already. I am fortunate enough to call her a friend, and an inspiration. Here is a conversation I had with her a few weeks ago.

I’ve heard you like to read a lot. What inspirations or life lessons can you tell us about that you’ve pulled directly from your literary adventures lately?

Lately… let’s see.. I just got my first book on Audible for my last flight home from touring in Alberta. That’s been a new experience to listen to a book, on my phone. It’s the new novel by one of my favorite authors, Louise Erdrich. She mostly centers her stories around people of the Ojibwe nation. Weaving in the spirituality, politics and humor of Native American life in the past and present in such an earth bound yet ever uplifting way. And the land that she inherits and evokes is that of the plains of North Dakota and Minnesota which is where I spent most of my childhood.

You’re on the road quite a bit and have made some great musical friends along the way from what I can gather. What is your favourite thing about being a part of such a nomadic musical community, how has it enriched your life experience?Any specific meetings you can recall that have changed you?

My big dreams as a young picker were to meet my heroes and heroines. It’s such a beautiful and rare thing to be so moved by the work of an artist or musician. And to meet them and collaborate is just mind blowing. Yesterday I got 4 copies of my debut, self titled cassette (1994) in the mail from a store that just went out of business in Texas. I remember sending that tape off to Iris Dement and then getting a call from her to tour together. I gave that tape at least 3 times to Shawn Colvin and then when my first full length CD ‘River Under The Road’ came out in 1997 she called me at work and asked if I wanted to open some shows for her. Crazy town.

What differences, if any, have you observed in the way women and men approach songwriting? Do you believe their perspectives are different, or inherently linked?

No I haven’t really noticed any difference between the sexes. To me there are two very important things that go into songwriting, craft and inspiration. One who is continually in touch with who they are and what moves them and works to explore expressing that is an individual artist. They have a unique voice and open themselves up to that kind of personal inspiration. This takes as much practice and ‘showing up’ as learning the craft of how a song works, architecturally speaking.

What are your favourite moments like onstage, what is happening that gives you those magical moments while performing?

1. Feeling energy pour through me, smiling.
2. Connecting on another level with the band when everything just feels so connected and right.
3. When I hear someone in the audience whoop or holler!!!

What advice would you offer to other artists on searching for success?

First, we all can get to know our personal definition of success. I vacillate between feeling like the luckiest person alive to pouting and wishing that I could just get a break. My hope is to keep reaching more and more people through music. It’s the most fun, healing and positive way to communicate and I’m completely in love with the mysterious pioneering spirit that it set up inside me.

 


Austinist 5/31/13

Preview: Singer-Songwriter Ana Egge Plays Cactus Cafe

Ana_Egge_Jack_Hirschorn_1-300x199.jpgPhoto Credit: Jack Hirschorn

While many musicians have time when they’re specifically on the road or off, singer-songwriter Ana Egge is perpetually touring. But the fact of the matter is, regardless of how punishing it may become, maintaining a fan base is a full-time-plus job nowadays – especially when you cannot depend on a record label to help with some of the heavy lifting. Egge, who plays UT’s Cactus Café on Saturday night, knows that keeping her fans close-by is up to her; she tows the line by performing as many dates as she possibly can.

A Canadian native, Egge grew up with parents that moved her between North Dakota and a hot springs commune in New Mexico, something that has undoubtedly made it easier for her to adapt to a transient existence as an adult. She uses the ever-changing landscape of cities and faces to color her songwriting, which brims with fleeting encounters and snapshots of rugged humanity. And while Egge definitely qualifies as a folkie, each one of her releases has had it’s own distinctive flavor, unified by her breathy, booze-lilted pipes and inherent gift for storytelling.

The most recent, 2011’s Steve Earle-produced Bad Blood, focused on the resulting emotional fallout from relationships tainted by mental illness. Her foray onto the dark side proved quite striking, and Earle revealed himself as the ideal musical partner for the project. No stranger to such struggles, his musical instincts lent themselves to the songs quite naturally. The collection continues to turn up well-deserved accolades even as Egge readies her next album: in March, the track “Hole in Your Halo” was nominated for the Independent Music Awards’ Best Americana Performance.

We had a chance to catch up with Egge, a former Austin resident and happily married lesbian who now calls Brooklyn home, for a brief chat earlier this week.

As you’ve progressed through the years, has the process by which you write songs changed at all? Tell us a little about your process. Do you write one at a time, or do you always have a few songs going at once?

Songwriting for me is something akin to being a thermometer… or being turned on, or sensitive. Maybe I’ve become more attuned to the feeling that I should step away and work on a melody that’s running through my head, or write down the lines that are coming up. It’s like I’m writing songs that I fall for, that I want to sing over and over again.

Have you found time during your schedule to begin work on a new album?

Yes – I just recorded my new record and will be mixing it next month. I love it! I recorded it with a great young bluegrass band, The Stray Birds, from PA, backing me up. The working title is Bright Shadow.

If I’m not mistaken, you’re married now… how has that affected your ability to tour like you always have? Is it an issue?

No, not really. My wife is completely supportive. It’s hard though, to be away on those long 4-6 week tours. Especially if it’s overseas, with the time difference.

Bad Blood was dark – has playing the material for nearly two years now helped you work through whatever forces influenced the writing for that record?

Yes definitely. I’ve had a lot of open conversations about mental health with strangers because of these songs, which is powerful.

When you lived in Austin, what was your favorite thing about the city?

So many things were my favorite. My years in Austin – from 1995 to 2000 – were amazing. I fell in with the best crowd of musicians and writers and just flowered there. I loved living in South Austin. Barton Springs, Artz’, The Continental. I still miss Las Manitas big time.

Traveling as much as you do can be really hard on folks that don’t naturally embrace the ‘nomadic’ life – tell me a bit about why you love it as much as you do, and what you could change if you were able.

To quote Willie, “…the life I love is making music with my friends.” And when I met him a couple years ago, when we said goodbye he said, “I’ll see you on down the road.”

Ana Egge at Cactus Cafe
Saturday, June 1
Doors @ 8 PM, Show @ 8:30
Tickets are $12 – purchase here


Austin Chronicle 5/30/13

ANA EGGE

Sat., June 1, 8:30pm

Cactus Cafe, Texas Union, UT campus, 512/475-6515

The quiet, homespun folkie living here in the late Nineties has been supplanted by a NYC singer-songwriter with an East Coast edge. Ana Egge’s latest, the Steve Earle-produced Bad Blood, deals in a natural and uncompromising way with her emotional struggles following a family member’s bouts with mental illness. Appearing on campus unaccompanied, she continues to tell previously unsung stories with simple melodies, compassion, and charm.

– Jim Caligiuri


IMA Nomination for ‘Hole In Your Halo’

‘Hole In Your Halo’ has been nominated for best Americana song in the 12th Annual IMA Music Awards!

http://www.independentmusicawards.com/imanominee/12th/Song/Americana