Ana Egge
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http://www.guitarworld.com/exposed-10-female-guitarists-you-should-know-part-2 “>http://www.guitarworld.com/exposed-10-female-guitarists-you-should-know-part-2

10 Female Guitarists You Should Know, Part 2

Posted 09/02/2011 at 10:14am | by Laura B. Whitmore, Anna Blumenthal

 

Ana Egge

Here’s something you don’t see every day: a guitar player who built her own guitar. Yep, when she was 17, Egge’s astrology teacher, also an accomplished luthier, invited her to work on a guitar as his apprentice … and she still plays it to this day (Wait, they teach astrology in high school?). You can see a vignette about her guitar on MusicRadar here. Egge has toured and shared the stage with a stable of greats including Lucinda Williams, Ralph Stanley, Shawn Colvin, Joan Armatrading, Iris Dement, Richard Thompson, George Jones and many more. This North Dakota-raised songstress knows how to dish out some sadly sweet ballads. Her latest release, Bad Blood, came out August 23 on Ammal Records, produced by Steve Earle. Egge’s ethereal vocals spin above some sweet, chiming guitar tracks, complete with effective effects. Perfect for those full-pint-of-ice cream, melancholy rainy evenings. Visit anaegge.com for more info.

Here she is with the infamous self-made guitar:

 


Cowbell



Americana UK


  • Ana Egge “Bad Blood”  Condemnation to redemption: A day in the life
  • Tim Merricks
    Wednesday, 28 September 2011
  • Ana Egge has been recording her own special brand of wisdom since the late nineties and Bad Blood is her seventh and most bittersweet offering yet. On first listen it’s easy to dismiss Egge as another folk songstress with a pretty voice and vague lyrics. But before you file her away with the MySpace race, listen a bit harder; dig a bit deeper and a bigger picture will emerge. This is a woman exorcising her demons on an intensely personal level.

  • As has always been the case with Egge, her songs improve with each listen, although her musical identity remains hard to pin down. The Bowery coffee shop indie folk of 2007’s ‘Road to my Love’ is still to be found, but the focus has shifted back to her country roots and ‘Bad Blood’ has a distinctly southern flavour.

    The story is one of mental illness based on Egge’s own family experiences and expressed with a sense of futility laced with compassion and hope. It’s the harsh reality of ‘Bad Blood’ which creates the edge. It’s a rallying call, a plea for normality and a paradox of injustice. And it makes for intoxicating listening. ‘Driving with No Hands’ sets the scene and although the metaphors come thick and fast they barely disguise the brooding sensibilities of the subject matter and, along with the driving guitars conspire to push the Travis Bickle style character of the narrative over the edge.

    ‘Bad Blood’, ‘Hole in Your Halo’ and ‘Evil are also, as the titles suggest, dark but fascinating products of troubled contemplation. Remarkably for a record so heavily reliant on such unfortunate circumstances it’s all surprisingly upbeat from thereon in. It’s as if Egge decides to wash away her own bad blood and a light appears at the end of the tunnel which we follow to the positive, hope filled conclusion of ‘Your Voice Convinces Me’. The drums and fiddle certainly compound this effect, for which I suspect that some of the credit goes to a certain famous collaborator. The fact that this was produced by country outlaw Steve Earle has obviously had an impact, but although his influence is noteworthy and his presence felt, this is very much Egge’s baby and not Earle’s protégé as some commentators have inferred.

    Egge has been around long enough now to inspire as well as be inspired by, she just flies a little too low under the radar to be easily picked up on these shores. She has been described as “the Nina Simone of folk” and much more besides. I can’t help imagining a Bakersfield version of Suzanne Vega at her peak.  You will draw your own comparisons, but one thing is certain; it will be with someone who has attitude and the courage of her convictions, and maybe young female artists will in time be hailed as the next Ana Egge.

  • http://www.americana-uk.com/cd-reviews/item/ana-egge?category_id=175

Record Dept.


ANA EGGE | BAD BLOOD

ANIMAL RECORDS

Singer/songwriter Ana Egge, called the Nina Simone of folk by Lucinda Williams for her impassioned and confident lyricism, is out with her seventh studio album, Bad Blood. This time Egge turns her sharp storytelling lens on mental illness and family, touching on the concept of bad blood both as hatred as well as hereditary disease. Such loaded material could weigh down composers of lesser skill, but Egge’s talent is well-honed and resplendent on this collection. Aided by Steve Earle as producer and backing vocals, singer Allison Moorer, and Eleanor Whitmore on a variety of strings, the twelve acoustic numbers are Egge’s best to date. Standouts include “Evil”, “Driving With No Hands”, and “Shadow Fall.” – Written by JFelton

SIMILAR | Iris DeMent, Grievous Angels, Joni Mitchell, Lucinda Williams


CT Entertainment


CT Entertainment

Ana Egge’s haunting CD captures the feelings of those who have a mentally ill loved one

by Mark Moring

Your picture’s fallin’ like a figurine
Breaking branches in our family tree . . .
I loved you and I hated you
I prayed for you and stayed away from you

So sings Ana Egge on the title cut of her latest album, Bad Blood. Many of the songs were written about coping with mentally ill family members, and I, for one, can certainly relate to the lyrics above.

Our 20-year-old son has bipolar disorder and Asperger syndrome, and his family members have certainly felt all of those things and more. It really can be a love-hate relationship — intense love for the person, but intense hatred for the illness and the ugly, often hurtful, ways it manifests itself. Kudos to Egge for capturing many of those feelings.

A press release says that the album “conveys compassion and hope for redemption,” and while that’s certainly true, Egge also noted in one interview that it also captures her raw emotions. “There is some anger on this record,” she confesses. “When you have family members suffering, I’m not angry at them. I have had a lot of anger at the illness, wanting it to stop, go away. A lot of the writing freed up for me when I started writing about the illness itself as a character.”

Like many of us who love someone with a mental illness, Egge is trying to find that balance between loving the person but loathing the condition. These lines from “Hole in Your Halo” kind of capture that vibe:

Your flowers are growin’ wild in the west
They may be pretty but they’re poisonous
Behind the bars you’re falling apart
It’s not the first time you went too far

There’s a hole in your halo
Where the darkness don’t shine
In the darkness I know
It’s a thin line

Egge’s country-fied folk tunes, produced by Steve Earle, sound more upbeat than the subject matter they’re addressing, but the lyrics are spot on.

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctentertainment/2012/01/-your-pictures-fallin-like-1.html

 


Toronto Star


By Nick Krewen
Special to the Star
Jan 31, 2012

When is a Canadian not quite Canadian?

When she’s Americana songwriting folksinger Ana Egge (pronounced Eg-gy), born 35 years ago in Estevan, Saskatchewan, but raised in Ambrose, North Dakota and Silver City, New Mexico.

“I was born in ’76 when it wasn’t automatic — you weren’t automatically deemed Canadian for being born there,” she laments down the line during a break from writing at her Brooklyn, New York home.

“My parents are both American, so I was naturalized American. But I’m about to apply to get dual citizenship. I’m so excited!”

Regardless of her citizenry, Egge should be given the fast track to nationalization for the amount of domestic musical-community service she’s accumulated over 15 years and seven albums.

First, there’s the Ron Sexsmith connection: she covered his “Lebanon,

TN” on her sophomore effort, 1999’s Mile Marker and “Wastin’ Time” on 2007’s Lazy Days. He contributed harmonies to her 2005 albumOut Past the Lights; she to his 2001 Steve Earle-produced chestnutBlue Boy, a project that helped her decide to recruit Earle last summer as overseer of her current album, Bad Blood.

She’s even made good use of Sexsmith’s band, as bassist Jason Mercer produced Out Past the Lights and guitarist extraordinaire Tim Bovaconti has embellished a few of her recordings.

Nova Scotian Joel Plaskett produced a chunk of 2009’s Road to My Love after she contributed harmony to his Three, and also sang on Peter Elkas’ latest Repeat Offender, while Bourbon Tabernacle Choir founder Chris Brown and Be Good Tanyas’ co-founder Frazey Ford have chimed in on Egge albums as session musicians.

Even when she performs a two-night stand at the Dakota Tavern beginning Thursday, her accompanying band will be, as she says, “all Toronto guys” — led by Peter Elkas on guitar with Doug Friesen on bass and Gavin Maguire on drums.

Egge, whose sanguine alto sounds like a teakettle blend of Bonnie Raitt, Natalie Merchant and Kathleen Edwards, will be making her first local appearance to support Bad Blood, a 12-song album that tackles the theme of mental illness and how it’s impacted Egge’s immediate family.

“It wasn’t meant to be that way,” Egge concedes. “It was mostly just dealing with my own feelings about the reality of people I love — my family — dealing with mental illness. I was feeling stuck as a writer, because I didn’t want to make anything harder for anybody, but I came to realize that I had a lot of frustration and anger about the disease, not knowing what to do about it.”

“So I started writing with mental illness itself as the character, and that really set me free.”

“Sun don’t shine/ In the darkness I know,” Egge sings sadly on “Hole in Your Halo,” and whether she performs the strident title track or the mid-tempo rocker “Motorcycle,” she surprised at the chord the subject matter has struck with her audience.

“It’s been really healing,” says Egge of fan reaction. “It’s one of those things that people don’t know how to deal with or talk about . . So it’s been pretty amazing hearing stories and experiences from people who come up to me at shows, and those who reach out to me online. I think they do it just because of that silence that surrounds it.”

Born to hippie parents, Egge spent her first five formative musical years in Austin, Texas, first inspired by the Silver City visits of noted bass player Sarah Brown, the aunt of one of Egge’s friends.

“I’d hear stories of Sarah playing bass with Bonnie Raitt and Antone’s Blues Band, so when she would come to visit I’d pick her brain about everything,” Egge recalls. “After a second visit, Austin became this mythical place, and I could not just wait to go there.

“So I visited once and they let me go into all the music clubs despite the fact that I was underage. That was it: I was moving there as soon as I graduated high school.”

She immediately established musical connections with songwriter Jimmie Dale Gilmore and western swing band Asleep At The Wheel, whose drummer Dave Sanger produced her 1997 acclaimed debutRiver Under the Road.

Since then, it’s been a succession of folk, country, rock and bluegrass-blended albums on small independent labels, winning over musical fans like Sexsmith, Earle and Lucinda Williams as she continues to make strides in searching for that Americana/folk breakthrough.

As much as she enjoys performing, Egge, who builds her own guitars, says her greatest joy is hearing otherartists like Dave Alvin and U.S. folkies Laurie Lewis and Slaid Cleaves cover her songs.

“It’s such an amazing feeling to finish a song and then know that you love it and want to play it over and over again and share it with people.

“But hearing someone else sing it and play it, it’s great.”

Just the Facts

Who: Ana Egge

Where: Dakota Tavern, 249 Ossington Ave.

When: Feb. 2 and Feb. 3, 7 p.m.

Tickets: $12 at the door

http://www.toronto.com/article/711932–folkie-ana-egge-s-maple-leaf-with-an-asterisk


Indie Mag -bands to watch


Indie Mag March 2012

Indie Mag: Indie Mag March 2012

Indie Mag is a new magazine for independent musicians highlighting scenes, musicians, and music driven causes from around the world. Each issue is filled with interviews and features – from indie innovators to acclaimed songwriters, from producers to managers, from up-and-coming artists to label…

Find out more on MagCloud


Maverick UK


Ana Egge
BAD BLOOD
Ammal Records
4 stars

http://www.maverick-country.com/#/ana-egge/4561008781

Pure-voiced, outstanding guitar player and evocative songwriter, Brooklyn-based Ana Egge, now onto her seventh album, has certainly come up with something very profound and original here. The keynote of most of the songs on this collection is the severe problems caused by mental illness within close family, something Egge has had to cope with pretty well all her life. She wanted to put it out in bluegrass style that was until producer and country rebel Steve Earle piled in a thumping drumbeat on most of the tracks which it has to be said works really well.The opener ‘Driving With No Hands’ sets the scene describing destructive mood swings: ‘when I wake up … will I wake up?’ and the tone doesn’t change too much with the next two songs ‘Hole In Your Halo’ and the title track, all complete with some brutal guitar chords and menacing strings. Steve Earle says it far better than I can: ‘Ana Egge’s songs are low and lonesome, big, square noir ballads which she plays on a guitar built with her own two hands and sings like she’s telling us her deepest darkest secrets.’‘Evil’ is another utterly enthralling track telling of a man compulsively driven to the ultimate crime but unable to live with the guilt that follows. The tone does change for several of the later tracks. ‘Motor Cycle’ is a song in praise of the freedom that pastime brings and Egge’s personal experience and enjoyment is evident. I must also commend ‘Silver Heels’ a graphic song dedicated to the ladies of the night on the high plains of Colorado, ‘Your Voice Convinces Me’ with vocal backing from Earle and wife Alison Moorer and Ana’s fine rendition of Charlie Rich’s out and out country ‘There Won’t Be Anymore’ which is the closing track.No less authority than Lucinda Williams has called Ana Egge: ‘an exceptional songwriter—the Nina Simone of folk.’ One day Egge will make it really big and maybe her career path will follow that of Williams who was producing superb albums for nigh on twenty years before CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD really awakened everyone to her talents. There again the very courageous BAD BLOOD may just do it for her, I certainly hope so. Paul Collins www.anaegge.com


Maverick UK


Ana Egge
BAD BLOOD
Ammal Records
4 stars
http://www.maverick-country.com/#/ana-egge/4561008781

Pure-voiced, outstanding guitar player and evocative songwriter, Brooklyn-based Ana Egge, now onto her seventh album, has certainly come up with something very profound and original here. The keynote of most of the songs on this collection is the severe problems caused by mental illness within close family, something Egge has had to cope with pretty well all her life. She wanted to put it out in bluegrass style that was until producer and country rebel Steve Earle piled in a thumping drumbeat on most of the tracks which it has to be said works really well.The opener ‘Driving With No Hands’ sets the scene describing destructive mood swings: ‘when I wake up … will I wake up?’ and the tone doesn’t change too much with the next two songs ‘Hole In Your Halo’ and the title track, all complete with some brutal guitar chords and menacing strings. Steve Earle says it far better than I can: ‘Ana Egge’s songs are low and lonesome, big, square noir ballads which she plays on a guitar built with her own two hands and sings like she’s telling us her deepest darkest secrets.’‘Evil’ is another utterly enthralling track telling of a man compulsively driven to the ultimate crime but unable to live with the guilt that follows. The tone does change for several of the later tracks. ‘Motor Cycle’ is a song in praise of the freedom that pastime brings and Egge’s personal experience and enjoyment is evident. I must also commend ‘Silver Heels’ a graphic song dedicated to the ladies of the night on the high plains of Colorado, ‘Your Voice Convinces Me’ with vocal backing from Earle and wife Alison Moorer and Ana’s fine rendition of Charlie Rich’s out and out country ‘There Won’t Be Anymore’ which is the closing track.No less authority than Lucinda Williams has called Ana Egge: ‘an exceptional songwriter—the Nina Simone of folk.’ One day Egge will make it really big and maybe her career path will follow that of Williams who was producing superb albums for nigh on twenty years before CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD really awakened everyone to her talents. There again the very courageous BAD BLOOD may just do it for her, I certainly hope so. Paul Collins www.anaegge.com